YELLOW-CRESTED COCKATOO for sale

YELLOW-CRESTED COCKATOO

The Yellow-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea) is Critically Endangered in the wild.

The sulphur-crested cockatoo is one of the largest of the several species of beautiful white cockatoos. It is a different species than the lesser sulphur-crested cockatoo.

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Although spectacular in appearance, this huge, active parrot is brilliant, long-lived, and noisy; and it is very challenging to keep as a pet. This bird expects a lot from its owner and it is recommended only for experienced owners who are up to the task. For a motivated owner, the sulphur-crested is a once-in-a-lifetime pet.

Yellow-crested Cockatoo

   
English name
Yellow-crested Cockatoo
Scientific name
Cacatua sulphurea
Color of feathers
White, yellow under wings
Color of crest
Bright yellow
Body size
34 cm
Sex differences
Male as black eyes, female has brown eyes
Quickly tame
Yes
Cage or aviary

Cage more common, both possible

Speech and Vocalizations

These birds are excellent mimics and can quickly learn to speak words and phrases. The sulphur-crested cockatoo also has a piercingly loud shriek. This species is not well-suited to apartment living as its noisiness can be considered a nuisance to close neighbors.

Sulphur-Crested Cockatoo Colors and Markings

Sulphur-crested cockatoos are primarily white with black beaks. They sport a beautiful crest of yellow feathers on top of their heads. It has a yellow wash on the underside of its wings.

The sexes look similar, although the female can be distinguished at close range by its reddish-brown eye. The male's eyes are darker brown or black. This distinction does not become apparent until the bird has reached maturity, which varies between 3 to 5 years of age.

Caring for the Sulphur-Crested Cockatoo

Sulphur-crested cockatoos are large birds that need very spacious enclosures. At a minimum, the cage should have a footprint of about 40 inches by 40 inches and at least 5 feet tall. A bigger cage is better, and best of all is an aviary environment.

The birds naturally emit a downy powder, which aids in keeping their wings and skin healthy. This powder may be problematic for some people with allergies.

Bird bathing is strictly an individual preference. In the wild, some cockatoos enjoy standing in the rain while others avoid it.