8 customer reviews

24.0030.00

  • If the eggs don’t Hatched or broken; We will replace or refund payment
  • Eggs are shipped along with a hatching,feeding & CD guide
  • Can I order eggs of different species? YES
  • Minimum order: 2 eggs
  • Order 20 eggs & get Free Rcom 20 eggs Incubator & Egg Candle, Free Shipping.
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
24.00
  • Money back guarantee if the item you received is not as described, or if your item is not delivered within the Buyer Protection period.

Prices go up when the timer hits zero

  • 100% Money Back Warranty
  • Free & Fast Delivery from €150
  • Our Buyer Protection policy covers your entire purchase journey.
  • 30-day Free Return

lovebird eggs

Fertile lovebird eggs

Lovebird might be one of the smallest parrot species available as a companion pet, but this bird is inquisitive and seemingly always on the go. As their name suggests, lovebirds are known for the loving, attentive bond they tend to form with their mates.
Beautiful and intelligent, these little birds have been one of the most beloved types of African parrot for more than 100 years.

“Lovebirds are one of the most popular pet parrot species, and for those who are familiar with them, it’s no surprise.”
They have a Lifespan: 10 – 15 years.

How long do Lovebird eggs take to hatch?

About 22-25 days after the egg is laid the chick will be ready to hatch. This period may vary by a day if the correct incubation temperature of 99.5°F (37.5°C) and hatcher temperature of 98.5°F (36.9°C) have been maintained and weight management practiced. Pip occurs at 48 to 24 hours prior to hatch.

EGG LAYING:

The hen may begin laying eggs in as little as two weeks after the first mating. This being said, sometimes a hen may get carried away and begin laying without a mating having taken place.

Candling Eggs to Assess Fertility and Embryo Development:
Eggs can be candled about 6 to 12 days after their incubation has begun to verify fertility and development of the egg. At that time you should see a web of tiny red/pink veins starting to become visible inside the shell.
Shining a light through the egg to observe embryo development is called “candling.” White or pale eggs are more easily candled than dark or speckled eggs, which require a high-intensity candler.

The presence of embryos can be confirmed easily after 6 days to 12 days of incubation.
The embryo is located in the large end of the egg, where blood vessels radiate under the surface of the shell.
The embryo appears as a dark spot that becomes larger as incubation progresses. Eventually only a dark mass and the air cell are seen.

Candling and Egg Development | Community Chickens

EGG HATCHING
Before an egg hatches, the chick inside starts peeping. The chick uses a special egg tooth to peck around the circumference of the egg. It takes from a few hours to two days to peck all the way around it, depending on the strength of the chick and the thickness of the egg. This process is called “pipping.” Once a chick has pipped most of the way around its egg, it turns inside the shell and breaks out of the egg.
After the exhausting hatching, the chicks can often be seen resting on their backs. During these first few hours of its life. For the next 8 to 12 hours, the parents(Breeder) will not feed the chick, as it receives nourishment from absorbing its yolk sac. Feeding starts only after 8 to 12 hours after hatching.

DEVELOPMENT:

The first 10 days of a chick’s life is a period of very rapid growth and development.

For the first week, the chicks are blind and helpless. A newly hatched chick is wet and has the appearance of an embryo.

After about 10 days you will be able to see pin feathers, which are their first feathers. At that time, the chick can easily move around the nest box and beg for food. Their vocalizations change from soft peep, peep, to loud and raspier calls for food.

BEFORE EGG-LAYING:

The female(hen) will spend more and more time in the nest box, and she will feed from the cuttlebone and mineral block, the nutrients of which she needs to form the eggshell.

At this point it is especially important to provide water for bathing as she needs the moisture for the egg-building process within her, as well as to regulate the humidity in the nest box.

One way you will know eggs are on the way (within a day or so) is that the hen’s droppings will be huge compared to what they would be under normal circumstances. The parents will store their droppings and eliminate less often but with bigger results when they do leave the nest box.

These large droppings will continue throughout the nesting period. The hen may only come out to eliminate every 12 hours.

How long can eggs sit before you put them in the incubator? Hatchability holds reasonably well up to 3 weeksTherefore, do not store eggs more than 3 weeks before incubating.

8 reviews for Fertile Lovebird Eggs

5.0
Based on 8 reviews
5 star
100
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
  1. Abigail

    Definitely best packaged eggs I’ve ever bought none were even scratched! All 8 would of hatched if I was here to increase humidity. Update they are 3 months old and are doing well I got 3 roosters and 4 hens! Was very happy when the seller replaced the unhatched eggs.Highly recommended

  2. Keith

    Very well packed for shipping and a nice variation of types of eggs received. Highly recommended.

  3. Dylan

    We are extremely satisfied and happy we ordered six eggs well packed. Also shipping was extremely fast.

  4. Beverly Grace

    I am very pleased with the way the eggs were delivered, well packaged and a great variety. I received 8 eggs and a week ago 8 cute little chicks joined my brood. I can’t wait to watch them grow.

  5. Alexis

    Very well packaged, fast shipping & several extras. Thank you!

  6. james (store manager)

    Available now

  7. Theresa

    8 out of 8 eggs hatched, Awesome hatch rate, chicks are healthy and adorable! Very happy!

  8. Jose Terry

    Well packed, shipped promptly.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Need Help?