Blue and Gold Macaw for sale

blue and gold macaw

The blue-and-gold macaw is aptly named, with a gorgeous blue body and dark lemon-yellow chest, this is a bird that’s hard to miss. It also referred to as the blue-and-yellow macaw. This macaw has a green strip of feathers just above its black beak, and a partially naked face that will blush pink when it is excited. Its feet are dark gray or black, and it has a black “beard” of feathers just below its beak.

Beautiful, captivating, intelligent, and majestic, blue and gold macaw are one of the most popular large parrots. These brightly colored beauties have much more to offer than just a pretty face; they are full of personality and comical charm. They are one of the more recognizable birds in the world and are an extraordinary pet for people who can handle a large parrot that demands attention.

Care & Feeding

In the wild, most macaws, including blue-and-gold macaws, eat a variety of seeds, plant material, fruits, and nuts. The wild macaw’s diet tends to be high in fat, which is acceptable for a bird that spends its day flying through the rainforest, finding food, nesting, and rearing chicks.

Companion macaws are lucky to have a much easier life than their wild counterparts, but they miss out on the ability to forage for their food, a behavior that comes naturally. Macaws, including blue-and-gold macaws, thrive on a nutritionally balanced diet, such as Lafeber’s Nutri-Berries and Lafeber’s Premium Daily Diet Pellets, as well as fresh fruits and veggies and healthy table foods.

Speech and Vocalizations

Blue and gold macaws are capable of ear-shattering calls, which are usually not appreciated by close neighbors. They are not the best choice for those who live in apartments and condominiums or if you have small children who are startled by noise.

This bird is a great talker; it can learn quickly and aims to please. Training is relatively simple as long as you are consistent. They can learn a vocabulary of around 20 words and phrases. Given the clarity of their voice, many people consider them one of the best talking parrots.

Blue and Gold Macaw Colors and Markings

Blue and gold macaws get their common name from their two most prominent feather colors. They typically have a green forehead, fading into a teal blue that covers the nape, back, tail, and wings. The chest and underside of the wings and belly are a bright golden yellow.

These birds have large black beaks and a black patch of feathers just underneath its beak. White patches of skin adorned with rings of tiny black feathers surround their eyes and cover much of the face.

Blue and gold macaws are monotypic, meaning there is only one bird that falls into the species. However, bird experts suggest that there are two variations or subspecies. These are the Bolivian blue and gold macaw, a larger bird with more of an actual blue coloring than the typical turquoise, and the blue-throated macaw, which has a teal blue throat instead of a black throat.

This bird is a monomorphic species, meaning males and females are barely distinguishable from each other. Many believed that the male has a flatter head, and the female has a narrower beak; the only way to prove the sex of this macaw is through surgical or genetic sexing.

Caring for a Blue and Gold Macaw

Like most macaws, the blue and gold thrives on attention from its owner and will form a strong bond with its family members. Take time to socialize these birds properly and to provide them with adequate mental stimulation; otherwise, they might resort to screaming out of boredom.

These raucous birds require a cage that is at a minimum at least 5-feet tall and at least 3- or 4-feet wide and long. The bird needs lots of room to stretch its wings, hop and climb around, and keep itself occupied.

Some owners even have a dedicated, bird-safe room. Since these birds gnaw on almost anything, remove electrical wires, jewelry, and wooden furniture.

Another consideration before you commit to getting this bird is the cost of ownership. In addition to the cost of the bird, think about the avian veterinarian bills, high-quality feed, and the accessory costs for a cage, play stand, and toys.